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Collect rewards

Jobhubble lets you easily earn cash rewards just by sharing jobs on social networks, blogs or directly with friends.

Simply sharing a job can earn you cash. If any of the jobs you share help an employer make a new hire, you will earn an additional referral reward of up to $2,000!

Collect the rewards for yourself or for a charity you're passionate about!

Simply share jobs on your social networks or refer a friend to start earning today. No spam!

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Bad Job Descriptions Are Turning Away Good Candidates

We’re in a highly competitive job market, and it’s one where candidates hold all the cards. Many recruiters are struggling to fill their open roles. While it’s great that companies are increasingly looking at improving their employer brand, candidate experience and their long-run candidate funnel, they’re overlooking a simple course of action — fix those job descriptions!

Poorly written job descriptions are the crack in the dam that leads to a deluge of “bad fit” candidates. They‘re also a huge turnoff to high performing candidates. The good thing is that since many companies (still) don’t have engaging, well written job descriptions, it’s the perfect opportunity for your company to get it right and stand out from the rest.

Many companies continue to ignore the fact that job descriptions are a piece of consumer marketing. Marketing departments work hard to get you excited about buying their products or services; recruiters must work just as hard to attract and convert potential candidates into applicants.

Stack Overflow looked through 6 months of data on job postings and found that the average apply rate for the best performing job postings was 30.9%, while the average apply rate for lower performing job postings was less than 3.2%.

They found that the three biggest factors associated with a high apply rate were:

- Culture description
- Interesting work
- Few bullet points

Culture Description
It’s not just about listing perks and benefits.

Candidates want to know more about your company. Good candidates want to know how they will work, not just what they will work on. They want to know about the team they will be collaborating with.

What are your company’s values? Many job seekers look at a company’s values and ethos as much as they look at the actual role itself. Look over your current description of your company, does it tell a compelling story? One that is exciting enough to make someone leave their company for yours?

Interesting Work
Explaining the type of work and type of projects candidates will work on is a great way for candidates to get excited about changing their jobs. It’s also a way for them to compare their current role with the one you’re offering to see if they’d be a good fit. When you talk about the role, describe how it will impact the business. The best candidates are ambitious. They want to hear about growth opportunities and the career paths available to them if they get the job.

A related but separate point, avoid vague requirements and industry jargon. Ditch the phrases that don’t actually explain anything or add value. In a survey of job seekers conducted by Monster, 57% of respondents said vague descriptions and phrases such as “self-starter”, “hit the ground running” and “penetrate the market” were big turnoffs and put them off applying.

Few Bullet Points
A lot of job descriptions read like a laundry list of requirements and tasks to be completed. Many companies make the mistake of asking for too much as well. Differentiate between must-haves and nice-to-haves. You could be missing out on a great candidate because they feel too overwhelmed or intimidated to apply.

In First Break All The Rules, Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman looked over 25 years worth of data from 80,000 interviews. They found that successful managers hire for talent and aptitude, not just for years of experience. They also focused on desired outcomes rather than rigidly defining the necessary steps to get there.
Seth Matheson puts it perfectly:

“I have never hired someone who meets all the requirements. If I were to hire someone with all the requirements I’d immediately need to give this new hire a promotion. This is a flawed way of looking at a job description, and it’s also a flaw created by the job description.”

Just hammering the point home here, in the above mentioned Stack Overflow article, job descriptions with a laundry list of bullet points had a 7% apply rate vs a 46% apply rate for descriptions with few bullet points.

Stop Using “Rockstar”, Ninja, Jedi etc.
I’d like to add one thing here. Enough with “rockstar developer” and “customer success ninja.” There are plenty of resources (here, here and here) available online to explain why these terms should be put to rest, but companies are still using them in job titles and job descriptions.

Making job titles clear and accurate is helpful for everyone. In the same Monster survey mentioned above, 64% of respondents said they wouldn’t apply for a job if they didn’t understand the title.

In a market where candidates have more choices than ever before, companies will have to work harder to differentiate themselves from other similarly “high growth and fast paced” companies. Offering candidates a deeper understanding of what role they’ll play in your company doesn’t necessarily mean writing a longer job description. What it does entail is having a more concise and appealing description of your open roles.