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Collect rewards

Jobhubble lets you easily earn cash rewards just by sharing jobs on social networks, blogs or directly with friends.

Simply sharing a job can earn you cash. If any of the jobs you share help an employer make a new hire, you will earn an additional referral reward of up to $2,000!

Collect the rewards for yourself or for a charity you're passionate about!

Simply share jobs on your social networks or refer a friend to start earning today. No spam!

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How to Reject Candidates the Right Way

Job seekers are frustrated. They spend hours writing their resume, researching your company, booking time off work for interviews, working their way through your hiring process only to be met with silence. Candidates shouldn’t have to chase down recruiters to find out what’s going on with their application. It either means your company doesn’t respect their time, or they’re completely in the dark about your hiring process.

Currently 40% of job seekers never receive a response or any type of communication from employers and 43% aren’t surprised if they don’t hear back from employers. How has this kind of behavior become standard practice? We can’t continue to make excuses for it, especially when candidates are four times more likely to consider a job with a company in the future if they’re given constructive feedback after rejection the first time. It’s time to add a little respect and dignity to the hiring process.

Inaction: What You’re Risking by Ignoring Rejected Candidates


Companies are spending more money on improving their employer brand without realizing that one of the easiest and best ways to improve their employer brand is to provide a great candidate experience, whether a person is offered the job or not.

By not sending an email or calling to inform candidates of their rejection companies risk:

Jeopardizing their employer brand: Candidates can share their negative experiences on social media and Glassdoor. Bad news travels fast. Why would you want your company’s name mentioned negatively? Candidates now research companies as thoroughly as they research the products they buy. Bad reviews of your interview process can add up, leading to less candidates in the future. A recent survey reported that 64% of applicants would share a negative application experience with friends and family.

Losing potential referrals: Candidates who have had a negative experience with your company’s hiring process won’t refer others, or worse, actively discourage others from applying.

Losing repeat applications: Candidates who could be right for your company in the future won’t bother applying again.

Losing customers: Virgin surveyed candidates they had rejected and found that 7500 people (roughly 6% of the total number of candidates) had switched to a competitor as a direct result of a poor recruitment experience. This amounted to £4.4 million in lost revenue, almost equal to the amount the company spent on hiring that year.


Why Aren’t Recruiters Following Up?


A bad candidate experience is detrimental to your employer brand and your bottom line. Most recruiters are aware of this, but they’re still not changing their behavior. A quick Google search led me to these reasons for not following up with candidates:

1) Employers are hedging their bets. They want to wait until the person they hire has started their job. From the beginning of the interviewing process to a successful candidate’s start date, this could be weeks without any communication.

2) Outside recruiters. The job was contracted out to an agency recruiter who doesn’t bother to follow up because they work on commission. Inform your partners what kind of response to candidates is expected of them.

3) Miscommunication. Agency and in-house recruiters think the other will contact rejected candidates. Work out a policy with partners beforehand. Either let your outside recruiters know feedback is important to your brand and that they must inform candidates of their status, or let them know you’ll take care of it personally.

4) Recruiters don’t have the time. Candidates have made time for your company, spare a moment for them. The job will only get harder if your employer brand deteriorates.


What Can Companies Do to Improve Their Candidate Rejection Process?


1) Keep the candidate informed. Lay out a clear outline of your recruitment process with your candidate so they know what to expect.

2) Have a rejection email template ready (examples here, here and here). You can personalize them with interview feedback. If you know the candidate isn’t right, send the rejection email as soon as possible.

3) Invite the candidate to stay in touch. Just because the role isn’t right for them now doesn’t mean something more suitable won’t open up in the future. Invite candidates to follow your company on social media for future job openings or to connect on LinkedIn. You also gain an opportunity to receive referrals from their network.

4) Outsource rejection. Hire a team of freelancers for $5–15/hour to send emails on behalf of your company. Craig Fisher of CA Technologies did this and saw candidate experience improve dramatically.

5) Ask candidates to rate their experience. You want to find out if your hiring process has been a good enough experience that candidates are willing to recommend you to somebody as an employer based on their experience. You can’t improve what you can’t measure.


The Future of Candidate Rejection


We get it, there aren’t visible ROI metrics that track time recruiters spend following up with applicants. Recruiters are measured on time and cost to hire. That’s why it’s important that executives within the company place an importance on candidate experience, everyone has to buy in. Thankfully HR is waking up to Candidate Relationship Management. It’s getting harder to recruit candidates in this competitive market, HR and management are finally paying more attention to nurturing relationships and building long run candidate funnels.

Ultimately, candidate experience is a form of customer service and companies are beginning to rethink their rejection process to reflect this line of thinking. The aim is to earn the trust and respect of every applicant, regardless of whether they’re hired or not. How companies decide to deal with candidate rejection says a lot about their character and values, we should be treating candidates as respectfully as we do customers because often times they are customers.

The bottom line is, if you were interested enough to bring the applicant in for an interview, you should be interested enough to let them know they didn’t get the job and why.